Eating disorders

Compulsive Overeating Disorder Treatment & Residential Rehab 

At Paracelsus Recovery, our compulsive overeating disorder treatment programmes will help you regain control over your diet, life and health. We will tailor-make the treatment programme to address your specific needs and restore your wellbeing.

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Treatment for Compulsive Overeating Disorder 

Compulsive overeating disorder is when a person consumes an abnormally high volume of food despite the negative consequences on their health, life, relationships and wellbeing. Foods high in fat and sugar can be extremely addictive because they trigger the release of feel-good chemicals such as dopamine. Dopamine is a chemical messenger in our brain that encourages us to repeat an action by producing feelings of pleasure or euphoria. When eating food causes the release of dopamine, the pleasure felt will override the body’s signals of fullness or physical satisfaction so the person will continue eating even though they are no longer hungry. If you are struggling with a compulsive overeating disorder, we can help. At Paracelsus Recovery, we tailor-make our treatment for compulsive overeating disorder to suit your specific needs. Treating one client at a time to ensure maximum confidentiality and unparalleled care, our team of specialist therapists and doctors address all the psychological and physical factors contributing to the compulsive overeating disorder. This ensures health is restored on a physical, emotional and neurobiological level. Treatment includes intensive psychotherapy, psychoeducation, biochemical restoration, complementary therapies and nutritional counselling. A live-in therapist is also available 24/7. We can provide compulsive overeating treatment in Zurich and in London.

Signs of a compulsive overeating disorder include: 

Withdrawal symptoms: For example, irritability, fatigue or sickness if certain substances are cut out of the diet. The development of a tolerance: This means needing to consume more and more food to obtain the ‘high.’ Never feeling full or satisfied after a meal: Never feeling psychologically ‘full’ even though you may feel physically sick.
Feeling guilty when eating: Spending a lot of time thinking about food, weight gain or eating in secret due to shame or embarrassment. Irrational fears about running out of food: For example, pre-emptively preparing for or panicking about not feeling full after a meal. The urge to eat is forceful and comes on immediately: A person struggling with compulsive overeating disorder can sometimes feel ‘blinded’ by the desire to eat. This is different from physical hunger which is a more gradual sensation.

compulsive overeating disorder

Compulsive overeating disorder is the result of specific patterns of thinking and feeling and is often a coping strategy in response to trauma, relationship issues, childhood problems or stressful life events including marriage, family issues or pressure at work. In response to these painful experiences, food functions as a coping mechanism, allowing the person to feel momentarily detached from themselves, their emotions and their stress. Despite being one of the most pervasive eating disorders, a lack of education and stigma prevents the majority of people from receiving the treatment they need. Compulsive overeating is a complex addiction which is often co-occurring alongside other substance abuse issues or mental health conditions such as depression.

FAQs

Compulsive overeating disorder refers to a behavioural addiction whereby a person becomes dependent on the overconsumption of food as a way of coping with difficult emotions or real-life events. 
Numerous factors contribute to the onset of food addiction. In particular, mental health conditions such as depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder or anxiety can all be triggers as can stress, genetic dispositions and learnt behaviour from childhood if a parent or sibling suffered from food addictions.
Symptoms of compulsive overeating disorder include eating in response to feelings such as sadness, eating vast quantities of food alone or at night, never feeling full and feeling unable to stop oneself from eating. 
At Paracelsus Recovery, our compulsive overeating treatment includes an extensive assessment to identify the emotional and physical root causes of the compulsive overeating. We will then address all of the psychological issues in psychotherapy sessions and restore physical health via biochemical restoration and numerous complementary therapies to strengthen your mind-body relationship.
The main difference is that binge eating disorder refers to short intervals of uncontrollable food consumption followed by periods of restriction. Compulsive overeating refers to more consistent and generalised overconsumption of food, but the two conditions often overlap.