Self-Assessment
Are you feeling overwhelmed, exhausted, and detached from those around you? Or are you concerned that a loved one is burning the candle at both ends? Try our new burnout self-assessment calculator to find out more.

One Client at a Time

Unparalleled staff to patient ratio of 15:1

Burnout Self-Assessment Calculator

Disclaimer: our calculators are mere statistical tools with no predictive power. While our research team conducted a detailed study and only used scientific data to construct this model, data always has limits in assessing emotional and subjective experiences. For instance, there are multiple types of burnout, but we constructed our calculator using generalised symptoms and cannot specify which type you may be developing.

Instead, our team created this tool to provide you with a visual and data-based insight into the likelihood of developing burnout. If your results indicate that you could be burning out, we recommend seeking professional support or contacting your GP. Burnouts are highly challenging conditions, and the longer you leave them, the longer symptoms will linger.

What is Burnout?

People become burnt out when they are under constant stress for an extended period of time. At a certain point, your body and mind will enter into a state of complete exhaustion. In a sense, a burnout is akin to a shutting-down where your mind and body are trying to push you to rest. In reality, that exhaustion can feel like you’ve lost all sense of meaning or purpose in your life, which tends to be compounded by the idea that one is ‘messing up’ because they are so tired.

However, because we are all living such stressful lives, it can be very hard to spot when we are entering the danger zone. For example, surveys show that the pressure of working and living through a pandemic – with the compounded stress of little to no physical human contact – has resulted in burnout being the condition of the century. Yet, many of us may not have been so consciously aware of how stressed we were during lockdowns. Instead, maybe we drank more than usual, developed more frequent infections, or saw our self-esteem take a nosedive. Each of these are signs that your stress could be turning into a burnout.

Typically, there are four essential 'umbrella' burnout symptoms broken down into further signs. These include:

  • Physical and Psychological Exhaustion

When burnout begins, we tend to feel a constant sense of fatigue and exhaustion. You feel not only physically drained but also emotional and psychological depletion. For example, it can become difficult to focus, wake up in the morning, focus on a task, have a conversation with someone or even think of something enjoyable to do. However, it can be an insidious kind of exhaustion that equally keeps us up at night. We can end up in a kind of 'wired-but-tired' state of mind which wreaks havoc on our wellbeing.

  • Memory and Concentration Problems

As a result of that exhaustion, burnouts impact our cognitive performance, which means we might start to miss deadlines, make mistakes we wouldn't usually make, forget important events or meetings, find it hard to focus on what other people are saying, call into work sick more and so on.

  • Emotional Outbursts

If someone is in the midst of burnout, they will struggle to keep their emotions in check due to the exhaustion, lack of focus and lack of purpose they are struggling with. This means that their tolerance levels have nosedived. So, you might find yourself much more agitated or irritated than usual. In addition, you might struggle with outbursts of sadness and feelings of emptiness. These outbursts can be highly challenging and compound your exhaustion levels even further. In fact, one of the core reasons burnouts so often lead to substance abuse issues is because they function as a coping strategy for these emotional rollercoasters.

  • Mental (and Physical) Detachment

As the burnout escalates, you might start feeling completely detached from those around them. In extreme cases, you can even feel alienated and begin to suffer from depersonalisation. This can lead to increased self-isolation, taking on fewer projects at work, and a general sense of resistance to external people, events, and commitments.

Who is at Risk for Burnout?

While burnout is understood mainly as a career-related condition, it can happen to anyone whose responsibilities and commitments have overwhelmed them. Thus, there are numerous different forms of burnout, including parent burnout, student burnout, caregiver burnout, emotional burnout and so on.

In our clinical experience, executive burnout is a widespread condition amongst high achievers and C‑Suite executives. Those at the top have become so adapted to a stress-ridden and busy lifestyle that they can find it hard to even notice when they need to slow down, let alone actually have the space and time to take that break. For example, most successful business owners, executives, or those in the public eye have an unbalanced work-life ratio and extensive list of responsibilities. To suddenly halt on all of that can feel terrifying and in some instances, it can mean that a business will suffer, which only fuels the burnout even more.

Working in a high-pressure environment, feeling like there is little control over the work, lack of time for loved ones, and too many responsibilities can all contribute to the development of burnout. We have also noticed that there are various personality traits - such as perfectionism, ambition or a pessimistic outlook on life - that can increase your likelihood of becoming burnout. Underlying issues such as low self-esteem, poor boundaries and control issues are also common in those of us burning out.

Burnout can lead to various secondary symptoms, including insomnia, panic attacks, physical aches and pains, and heart attacks or strokes in extreme cases. If you are worried you might burn out, it is essential to address these signs and symptoms immediately. If left ignored, burnout will weaken the immune system, cause sleep problems, and incite feelings of helplessness, numbness, and disillusionment. Untreated burnouts also set you up for a host of further mental health conditions, particularly depression, anxiety and substance abuse issues.

Burnout Treatment at Paracelsus Recovery

At Paracelsus Recovery, our executive burnout treatments are tailored to each client's unique needs. To do that, we perform a comprehensive medical check-up, a psychiatric evaluation, extensive laboratory testing, a functional health assessment, and a nutritional and lifestyle assessment.

With this information, we work together (i.e. with the client) to develop a comprehensive and individually tailored care plan that will help you recover from the burnout and restore your physical, psychological and cellular health. We recognise that co-occurring conditions are common with burnout, so we will ensure to address each possible root cause of your symptoms.

We only treat one client at a time, which means our team will focus solely on you. The residential treatment program lasts four weeks and you will work with our treatment team from 8 to 12 hours a day. If necessary, we can also provide aftercare.

While treatment will vary on a case-to-case basis, it typically involves:

  • An in-depth biochemical analysis supervised by our functional medicine specialists.
  • One-to-one therapy to help you develop strategies to deal with stress, minimise emotional burnout symptoms and process any underlying traumas or stressors
  • A live-in therapist who will stay in the same residence and be available for emotional support 24/7
  • Complementary therapies such as reflexology, massage, acupuncture or yoga.
  • Our team will act as your responsibility-support system. We will never take your phone from you or demand that you quit working while you are with us. Instead, we provide boundary implementation, emotional regulation or distancing and stress-relief techniques to help you create a toolkit for effective stress management.

You can learn more about our treatment programmes for burnout here.



Questions

Answers

Do you find it hard to feel interested in activities you once enjoyed? (i.e., do you feel like all you do is work?)
Do you feel constantly drained or exhausted, despite how much or how little you sleep?
Do you experience frequent bursts of intense sadness or hopelessness?
Do you experience bursts of rage/frustration, particularly around work-related or parent-related responsibilities?
Do you feel increasingly low in yourself? (i.e., have you noticed your inner critic getting stronger?)
Do you sometimes feel as though you are a ‘failure’ or that you are on the wrong career path?
Do you feel lonely and/or disconnected from others?
Are you struggling to control your alcohol/cigarette/substance intake?
Do you have an executive or senior position in an enterprise or company with 1000+ employees?
Do you feel a lot of external pressure to succeed?
How wealthy are you now?
Are you struggling with brain fog? (e.g., are you finding it hard to remember typical things or events such as what you did yesterday or someone’s name)
Do you struggle to relate to other people or understand what they are feeling?
Are you finding it hard to concentrate on even simple tasks?
Do you feel like you are watching your life go by without much agency or control?
Have you been diagnosed with depression or anxiety?
Do you feel stressed out a lot?
Do you find it hard to say no to other people when they request something from you?
Do you think you are burnt out?
Is your outlook on life becoming increasingly cynical and negative?
Do you get sick more frequently or have you recently been diagnosed with a health issue (e.g. an autoimmune condition, skin issues or cardiovascular problems)?
Do you find yourself slowly losing any sense of commitment or care about whether or not you lose your job, loved ones or various other commitments in your life that you once cared deeply about?
Do you find yourself struggling with restlessness, excessive worrying and/or a sense of impending doom?
Are you struggling to see the purpose or meaning to your life and actions?
Are you struggling with sleep issues e.g. insomnia?
Are you struggling to control what you eat, or finding yourself consumed by cravings for carbohydrate-heavy foods? Or, conversely, are you struggling with a loss of appetite?
Have you experienced suicidal thoughts?
Do you find it hard to quieten down your mind?
Do you feel underappreciated by those around you? (i.e., by your family or co-workers?)
Do you feel like you are getting what you want out of your career?

Results / Answers

1-5: Low Risk of Burnout

Based on your answers, you have a low risk of developing burnout. By the sounds of it, you are managing your work and personal obligations with relative ease. Well done, that is not easy.

That being said, very low risk does not mean you never could. In choosing to complete this self-assessment, it could signal that you are concerned about various symptoms that you or a loved one are showing. While perhaps not indicative of burnout, they could be a sign that you are developing a different mental health issue that has a few similar symptoms of burnout.

For example, symptoms of an anxiety disorder or mood disorder can mirror symptoms of burnout. If you feel excessively worried, exhausted, nauseous and cannot shake the belief that you are making mistakes or that everything is going wrong, it could be signs of generalised anxiety disorder (GAD). Click here to learn more about the signs and symptoms of anxiety and how we can help you overcome the condition.

Alternatively, you could be experiencing burnout related symptoms because you are struggling with an undiagnosed physical health issue, such as biochemical imbalances. We would recommend speaking to your GP as soon as possible if this sounds likely to you.

5-10: Moderate Risk of Burnout

Based on your answers, you have a moderate risk of developing burnout. This means you may be developing a few classic symptoms but do not yet have enough to be diagnosed with burnout.

However, that being said, that does not mean you are not suffering, and you shouldn’t seek professional support. In choosing to complete this assessment and based on your results, you could struggle with symptoms requiring professional help. Burnout is a progressive condition. That means the longer we leave it, the worse it gets. In contrast, if you seek help early on, you increase your chances of a complete and relatively quick recovery.

Try to remain mindful that your symptoms could worsen and look out for any of the following signs that your burnout is worsening:

  • Alcohol or substance abuse issues
  • Increasingly low mood and fatigue
  • Changes in appetite or sleep
  • Increasingly harsh inner dialogue and anger towards loved ones
  • Losing hope that it will ever get better.
  • Sudden and impulsive decision making that provokes no emotional reaction, such as leaving your job or partner.
  • Suicidal ideation

Further, these results could also indicate that you are struggling with a mental health condition that has similar symptoms to burnout, such as depression or even a physical health condition like hyperthyroidism. We would recommend reaching out to your GP as soon as possible. Ideally, try to also find psychotherapeutic assistance and share your concerns with trusted colleagues and loved ones. It is crucial to try and cut back on whatever responsibilities you can, while also creating a plan of action for managing those you cannot in a less stressful manner.

10-15: High Risk of Burnout

Based on your answers, you have a high risk of developing burnout. This means you could well be in the midst of a burnout.

We are sorry to hear that you are struggling. Burnouts can be a highly debilitating and painful experience. We have seen how burnouts eat away at one’s relationships, careers, passions, and quality of life. While undoubtedly challenging, please remember that recovery is possible, and help is available.

We would highly recommend taking a break from any and all responsibilities that you can. Try to focus on stress-management, health restoration and recovery right now. Ideally, we would encourage you to reach out to your GP or find psychological support as soon as possible.

We understand that going to rehab or a clinic for burnout is not an easy decision. At Paracelsus Recovery, our treatment programmes are built upon our pillars of harm-reduction, addressing psychological and physical imbalances and providing you with the specific psychotherapeutic treatment you need. You can learn more about our programme here and if we are not a good fit, we can also recommend other quality providers.

If seeking professional help is not an option, please reach out to a loved one and let them know you are struggling. Working together, try to find ways to manage your stress. For example, exercise, eating healthy and avoiding alcohol or other drugs are a great aid in battling burnout. Try to prioritise your sleep, minimise screen time, and spend as much time as possible around people you feel support you. A burnout can feel relentless, but it will pass.

But more than anything else, if you think you or a loved one is suicidal, seek help as soon as possible. For example, contact your family GP or a treatment centre, or go to your local emergency room.

Contact us at info@paracelsus-recovery.com to learn more.

15-20: Very High Risk of Burnout

Based on your answers, you have a very high risk of developing burnout. This means you could well be in the midst of a burnout and you need to act on this immediately.

We are sorry to hear that you are struggling. Burnouts can be a highly debilitating and painful experience. We have seen how burnouts eat away at one’s relationships, careers, passions, and quality of life. While undoubtedly challenging, please remember that recovery is possible, and help is available.

We would highly recommend acting now and seeking support for your burnout. Chronic stress levels like those you might be experiencing can cause severe health issues down the line. In extreme cases, they can lead to death.

If possible, we would encourage you to seek treatment to help ensure you have the strongest chance of a quick and effective recovery. We understand that going to rehab or a clinic for burnout is not an easy decision. At Paracelsus Recovery, our treatment programmes are built upon our pillars of harm-reduction, addressing psychological and physical imbalances and providing you with the specific psychotherapeutic treatment you need.

If treatment is not an option for you, seek support from your GP, company and loved ones. Try to be honest with those around you about how you are feeling and ask for help. This could mean medical help, career help or parenting help. But, in whatever case, we strongly advise you to reduce your workload as much as you can. Then, try to find ways to manage stress. For example, exercise, eating healthy and avoiding alcohol or other drugs are a great aid in battling burnout.

There are various stress-relief techniques out there, from stress trackers to mindfulness and massages. Find something that works for you - even if it means bingeing your favourite show or playing a game you love for a day. The crux is to acknowledge that you are struggling right now and you need to show yourself the same compassion and care you would show a loved one. A burnout can feel relentless, but it will pass.

But more than anything else, if you think you or a loved one is suicidal, seek help as soon as possible. For example, contact your family GP or a treatment centre, or go to your local emergency room.

Contact us at info@paracelsus-recovery.com to learn more.

360° Treatment Approach - The most extensive and comprehensive treatment worldwide.

Medical Check-ups
& Treatments
Addiction
Counseling
Extensive
Psychotherapy
Eye Movement Desensitization
and Reprocessing
Family
Therapy
Psycho-Education
Neurofeedback
Interval Hypoxic
Hyperoxic Treatment
Bio-chemical
Restoration
Probiotic Therapies
& Psychonutrition
Lifestyle &
Nutritional Counseling
Bio Feedback
& Bio Resonance
Yoga
Reflexology
& Accupuncture
Massages
Personal training